Answered By: John Chan
Last Updated: Sep 20, 2016     Views: 27

The MLA Handbook(8th ed.) on page 54-55 provides numerous examples:

1) Mentioning the author's name in your sentence (this is most commonly done to ascribe a opinion to the author):

According to Naomi Baron, reading is "just half of literacy. The other half is writing" (194). One might even suggest that reading is never complete without writing.

2) Mentioning the author and page number in parenthesis (This is most commonly done for facts):

 Reading is "just half of literacy. The other half is writing" Baron 194). One might even suggest that reading is never complete without writing. 

3) For long quotes, longer than 4 lines, MLA suggests to "set it off from the text as a block indented half an inch from the left margin. Do not indent the first lineof an extra amount or add quotations marks not present in the original"(78). 

In Moll Flanders Defoe follows the picaresque tradition by using a pseudoautobiographical narration:

My true name is so well known in the records, or registers, at Newgate and in the Old Bailey, and there are some things of such consequence still depending there relating to my particular conduct, that it is not to be expected I should set my name or the account of my family to this work. ...

     It is enough to tell you, that... some of my worst comrades, who are out of the way doing me harm...know me by the name of Moll Flanders.....(1)

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